Monthly Archive for: ‘February, 2017’

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Psyched to be heading back to Mount…

Psyched to be heading back to Mount #Kilimanjaro in a couple days! It’s always a great mountain, a fun climb, and a wonderful adventure, and made even more so as my team and I will again be raising funds for @africaschoolassistanceproject (ASAP). Dedicated to education in Tanzania, and focused on underserved areas and girls education, ASAP has been recognized far and wide for their accomplishments and impact. Our team is aiming to raise $1/foot for the climb, or $19,340, every penny of which will go straight to ASAP and their impact in Tanzania. Follow along here, on Facebook, and on The MountainWorld Blog, and please follow the link in my profile to make a donation today! | This photo is from outside the Mawenzi Tarn Camp on the Rongai Route in June, 2016. #liveyouradventure #mountkilimanjaro #Tanzania #everydayafrica @kristenrcavallo @cplating @_mattcavallo

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I love that time of year when…

I love that time of year when the creeks swell with snowmelt and start weaving through ice dams and the sweet smell of spring is in the air, and the water is refreshing rather than deathly freezing. I love it… Just not in mid-February. | Today Bear Creek near Kittredge, Colorado, was flowing fast, snowmelt carrying away the ice that normally would provide a sturdy bridge across. 60 degrees my mid-morning in Evergreen. #notright #liveyouradventure #climatereality #climatechange

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I usually choose to go for hikes…

I usually choose to go for hikes where few others go, bushwhacking up drainages to connect one valley to another and better understand the landscape around me, getting the lay of the land and following my nose and heart… And just to truly be away and immersed in nature as much as one can be these days. One of my favorites is nearby, but seemingly miles away. Rye and I went there today, across a should-be-frozen-but-now-flowing-fast Bear Creek and then a couple miles back up a cool, semi-hidden canyon, following animal paths and scat, past fresh elk carcasses, and up through a labyrinth of rocks and cottonwoods and cacti to the 100 year old remains of an old home of which nothing but chimneys remain. There we found, sadly, the charming calling card of “CO Native”, scrawled in ugly paints on the old stacked stone, covering the rocks around, and his or her trash – Dasani bottles, Coors cans, a spent pack of Marlboro Reds. Well, congrats Colorado Native. You’ve succeeded in showing the world you’re nothing but an ignorant little sot who only succeeds in defacing history and the world around you to prove your own ignorance. Sad. As Ryrie said immediately and accurately: “What kind of person would do something like that, Dad? Seems like only a jerk.”

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The Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda and the…

The Rwenzori Mountains of Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo are one of the ranges in the world being hit hardest by climate change. When the Duke of Abruzzi went there in 1906, he and his team documented some 43 distinct glaciers; less than 20 remain, and those that do have less than 25% of their mass. The loss of glaciers in the Rwenzori is not just sad for climbers and tourists. Their waters help nourish vast plains and farmlands below, home to many people and critical species. And, the Rwenzori are a key source of the White Nile, and essential waterway in Africa. I find myself thinking of these and other ranges, and indeed the climate of the world as a whole, on this day as the Republicans are forcing through a vote on Scott Pruitt to head the EPA, conveniently before he’s forced to release some 3,000 emails from his time as Oklahoma AG between him and leaders of the oil, gas, and coal industries. Convenient. Is it within the rules? Sure. Does that make it ethical? Does it show responsible governing? Not at all. I know views on climate change are varied, but most logical souls agree now that the climate is changing, and a majority agree that scientists in the field are probably right that we humans have at least a little bit to do with it. (sarcasm) It used to be that America was a nation that took on challenges, that embraced problem solving and innovation not as barriers to success, but as opportunities for more. It is this ideal – not one of backward looking, reactionary thinking – that truly made America as close to great as it ever has been. One cannot realistically deny a changing climate, whether you believe humans are causing it or not. One cannot realistically deny that burning fossil fuels is a bad thing for our planet. Likewise, one can’t deny that figuring out alternative energy systems in conjunction with conservation (isn’t that where conservative comes from?) is a good and logical path to take. So, why the denial? Why the refusal to take logical steps, to reform our systems and strategies, to position us as a nation to embrace new technologies, create new jobs, and be a leader as we once were? #reallymakeamericagreatagain

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