Monthly Archive for: ‘November, 2018’

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As I sit here on a windy…

As I sit here on a windy November day, filling out my ballot for the midterm election, I find myself lost in thought, reflecting on the year past, the experiences had, and the murky vision of the future…my future, your future…my kids’ and your kids’ futures…our individual and collective futures. For me, it’s been a typically busy year, with travels across the country and the globe. I’ve been fortunate to visit old haunts and new locales, to sip tea with old friends and break bread with new ones. I sat with a Catholic nun in rural Guatemala and walked with an imam toward the Bishkek Central Mosque. I laughed and sipped chiyaa with an 80 year old sadhu in Kathmandu and talked over plates of ugali with Pentecostal preachers and community workers in Kenya. I’ve sipped coffee and nibbled a donut with Trumpers in Evergreen and had beers with Berners in Boulder, sharing conversation about that which unites us rather than that which divides. I’ve sat with my friend Luis – an undocumented Mexican who’s been a hard working, dedicated member of our society for 25 years – discussing the state of our world and the futures of our children; I’ve done the same with my friend Kelemu – who spent 14 years in Kakuma Refugee Camp before finally getting permission to come to the USA with his daughter – and works harder and longer and with more dedication than most, happy to be here and contribute to the fabric of our country. In all these travels and conversations and experiences, the commonality throughout has been simple, profound, and abjectly obvious: there is far more than unites us all than that which divides. The nun and the imam, the sadhu and the preachers, Luis and Kelemu, the Trumpers and the Berners and me…at the end of the day we all want the same essentials: a better tomorrow for ourselves and our families, the chance for a future of promise and opportunity, a life and a world with less war and conflict. But none of that is visible unless we are willing to drop the veil of partisan rancor, to abandon false division based on melanin or faith or flag, and instead open our minds and our hearts to the reality that we all breath the same, (continued in comments)

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